Family Fun in Ohio in the Middle of March

My dad had a stroke at the end of February, right before his 80th birthday.

I needed to go see him and help in any way I could.

So 7 of the kids and I piled into the van and drove for 2 days to go visit the grandparents and aunts and uncles and cousins. We stayed for almost 2 weeks.

My brother and sister and their families really made the time special for my kids.

kids of 4 wheelers

 

Keith Hawkey Family

 

 

me and joe

Emma and umbrella back

Emma and umbrella front

Morgan green shirt

All of us in green

all of us in green with me

Fiona in the woods

mom and dad irish shirts

Emma and Abby in green dresses

 Kelsey kept our traditions even though we were far from home.

 

She made green eggs and ham – which Patrick enjoyed immensely!

And she also made green lemon squares. Yum!

Green lemon squares

Patrick and fish

Garrett and Cody Fishing

Kelsey swimmin in it

Patrick and Cody sunbeam

Put St. Patrick Back in St. Patrick’s Day!

Wear your green clothes, eat your green eggs and ham, you can even draw some shamrocks. But, please, don’t forget to talk to your kids about St. Patrick. He was an amazing man. His story is miraculous and inspiring. And he used the shamrock to explain the Trinity as he spread the Gospel in Ireland. He transformed Ireland by his preaching and is responsible for bringing the Gospel to the West.

He was a real man who really lived, so this is an excellent chance to study the history of Ireland and the story of St. Patrick’s life. But Patrick was not Irish. If you didn’t know that, then you definitely need to read a biography about Patrick and find out how he became such a powerful missionary to Ireland!

I put a lot of neat activities on my Pinterest board about rainbows and shamrocks and leprechauns.

But the thing that I am most concerned that my children learn about is the life of St. Patrick and some of the history of Ireland.

For a listing of the miracles he did and an explanation of why we never hear about those miracles anymore, read this post.

There are many sources to use with children to share the story of St. Patrick.

One of these is Living Books Curriculum‘s free CM Helper that Sheila Carroll sends out when you sign up for her mailing list at her website. The one she sent out a few days ago tells the biography of St. Patrick, picture study, copywork, and mapwork about Ireland. There’s even a recipe for Irish Soda Bread!

Another one is the Veggie Tales video about St. Patrick’s life at YouTube.

It’s also on the Veggie Tales dvd called “Sumo of the Opera”.

Here’s a trailer of a video about Patrick’s life that looks good.

I believe the dvd is available at CCC of America.

Here is a good picture book with historical information included. It is called “St. Patrick” written by Tomie Dapaola.

Enchanted Learning has informative worksheets and printables and activities about Ireland, but there is a fee to join their website. It is $20/year.

Here is a webpage that highlights some books about Ireland with girls as the main characters. One of the books is about another early saint and miracle worker, Brigid, who became known as St. Brigid.Her parents were baptized by St. Patrick, and she became very good friends with Patrick. The character quality that is featured in her life is generosity. She was a miracle-worker similar to St. Patrick. Find this list here.

If you have older children, you could read a book called Celtic Flames to them. It contains stories about many past saints who worked miracles and lived wonderful lives, including St. Patrick. There is a section about Patrick that you could read to them on St. Patrick’s Day. The book is here and it is written by Kathie Walters.

And here is a coloring page of St. Patrick.

Here are some coloring pages and some copywork.

St. Patrick activity sheets

For a little taste of Irish culture, enjoy some Riverdance!

Have a Happy St. Patrick’s Day, and don’t forget the Patrick!

St. Patrick’s Breastplate (Prayer) and Miracles

God in my living
There in my breathing
God in my waking
God in my sleeping

God in my resting
There in my working
God in my thinking
God in my speaking

Be my everything
Be my everything
Be my everything
Be my everything

God in my hoping
There in my dreaming
God in my watching
God in my waiting

God in my laughing
There in my weeping
God in my hurting
God in my healing

Christ in me
Christ in me
Christ in me the hope of glory
You are everything

Christ in me
Christ in me
Christ in me the hope of glory
Be my everything

This song is a beautiful song that I heard in the Prayer Room at IHOP-KC.

In our homeschool studies, we studied about St. Patrick, and I read his prayer that he prayed every day. It was called St. Patrick’s Breastplate. It’s really long, so I won’t put the whole thing here. But here are some excerpts from it.

Excerpts from:
St. Patrick’s Breastplate Prayer

Christ be with me, Christ before me,
Christ behind me, Christ in me,
Christ beneath me, Christ above me.
Christ on my right, Christ on my left,
Christ where I lie, Christ where I sit,
Christ where I arise.
Christ in the heart of every man who thinks of me.
Christ in the mouth of every man who speaks of me.
Christ in every eye who sees me.
Christ in every ear that hears me.
Salvation is of the Lord.
Salvation is of the Lord.
Salvation is of the Christ.
May your salvation O Lord, be ever with us.

Do you see the similarities in the song and in St. Patrick’s prayer? They both reflect the fact that God and His Son, Jesus, are supposed to be everything to us. Everything in our lives is to reflect God and be done in Him and through Him.

So when I hear the song, “Everything”, I think of St. Patrick and his prayer.

St. Patrick is a hero in the faith that we should teach our children about. But you need to go to Catholic writings to find out what he really did. They believe in miracles, so they didn’t try to explain them away as coincidences or superstitions or legends.

I wrote a post about this last St. Patrick’s Day that you can find here. In it I mentioned a book by Kathie Walters, called Celtic Flames. I highly recommend reading this book to learn about true miracles that have been expunged from the history books of our time.

Here is some information about St. Patrick. The sources are Catholic and credible.

St. Patrick Raised the Dead – Many Times

For the blind and the lame, the deaf and the dumb, the palsied, the lunatic, the leprous, the epileptic, all who labored under any disease, did he in the Name of the Holy Trinity restore unto the power of their limbs and unto entire health; and in these good deeds was he daily practiced. Thirty and three dead men, some of whom had been many years buried, did this great reviver raise from the dead, as above we have more fully recorded. …

St. Patrick was a great missionary bishop who converted a whole land from paganism, overturning the religion of the Druids. He consecrated 350 Bishops, erected 700 churches, and ordained 5,000 priests. In less than 30 years the greater part of Ireland was Catholic. St. Patrick so consolidated it in the Christian faith that during the Protestant Revolt, Ireland was almost unique in its preservation of the Faith. Even today, people speak of “the faith of the Irish.”

It is hard, indeed impossible, to comprehend such a vast and enduring transformation without the visible support of God through great works and wonders. But that is what Christ promised to His Apostles, and it has been historically demonstrated in the well-attested lives of His great missionary saints.

Since St. Patrick is claimed to have worked 33 resurrection miracles, it seems a moral certitude that he truly must have worked at least a good number of such wonders, even if the count of 33 may not be exactly accurate. (Some details may be confused, and thus two slightly different accounts could actually refer to the same event.) It is only fair to report at least several of these.

* One day St. Patrick came to a place called Fearta. On the side of the hill two women had been buried. Patrick ordered the earth removed; in the Name of Christ, he raised them up. The two proclaimed that their idols were vain and that Christ was the true God. Along with the women, many bystanders were baptized. As the ancient writer observes, Patrick not only revived these two from a double death (both temporal and eternal death), but by this miracle he gave spiritual resurrection to many other souls.

* When Patrick came to Dublina he prophesied how great that small village would someday become. He also caused a fountain to spring up there. It happened that in the region nearby, the young son of the King lay dead in his chamber. The sorrow over his death was compounded when it was learned that his sister, who had gone to bathe in the neighboring river, had drowned in midstream. Her body was finally found resting on the riverbed, and was laid out beside that of her brother. Tombs were prepared for both according to pagan custom.

At this sorrowful time the rumor spread that Patrick of Armagh, who in the Name of the Unknown God had raised many that were dead, had arrived in the village. The king, Alphimus, promised that he, his nobles, and the whole “city” would be baptized into the new faith if his two children were restored. Patrick, seeing the opportunity for a great gain of souls, raised them both to life.

By the physical resurrection of the prince and princess, the spiritual resurrection of the whole area from the darkness of paganism and idolatry was accomplished. And the temporary resurrection of bodies (that is, until they died again) gave a promise of eternal life in Heaven and of the resurrection of the body on Judgment Day.

After the raising of this royal brother and sister, churches were built and tributes appointed to Patrick as their patron, that is, as the first Archbishop (or Bishop) of Armagh. It is reputedly from the revived Princess Dublina that the present great city of Dublin got its name. …

* On another occasion a band of men who hated St. Patrick falsely accused him and his companions of stealing, and sentenced them to death. Patrick raised a man from a nearby tomb and commanded him to witness to the truth of the case, which the resurrected man did. He protested the innocence of Patrick and his companions and the deceit of the evil ones. In the presence of all, the resurrected man also showed where the alleged stolen goods – some flax – were hidden. Many of those who had conspired for the death of St. Patrick now became his converts. …

* An evil man named Machaldus, and his companions, who placed on their heads certain diabolical signs called “Deberth,” signifying their devotion to Satan, plotted to mock St. Patrick. They covered one of their group, Garbanus, with a cloak as if he were dead. Garbanus, though in perfect health, was placed on a couch as if laid out in preparation for burial. The men then sent for Patrick, asking him to raise the covered Garbanus from the dead. This was a fatal mistake.

St. Patrick told them it was with deceit, but not with falsehood, that they had declared their companion dead. Disregarding their entreaties, Patrick went on his way, praying for the soul of the derider.

Then, uncovering their friend, the plotters found Garbanus not feigning death, but actually dead! Contrite of heart, they pursued St. Patrick; they obtained pardon and were baptized. At their entreaty, St. Patrick also revived the dead Garbanus.

The same once-evil Machaldus became a great penitent, a bishop eminent in holiness and miracles, and became known as “St. Machaldus.” …

Let no one doubt that the Lord gave to the humble Patrick the gift of raising the dead to life – for the glory of God, the proof of the True Faith, and the salvation of countless souls.

This article on St. Patrick is from a chapter in Saints Who Raised the Dead, True Stories of 400 Resurrection Miracles, by Fr. Albert J. Hebert, S. M.
http://www.traditioninaction.org/Questions/B255_StPatrick.html

Wrap-Up of the Last Three Weeks or So – Lots of Green!

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We’re sending Flat Travelers to Dayton, OH, our old stomping grounds, to see Wright Brothers memorabilia and other Dayton historical sites at Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park. The twins are sending their Flat Travelers together. I’m planning to get some books from the library about the Wright Brothers to read to the twins next week so they will be prepared for all of the information they will receive with their Flat Travelers when they come back.

We planted seeds that our bank gave to each of the kids when they opened savings accounts.

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Fiona’s pot was only growing one flower, so I went to the bank and got another dollar sign full of seeds for her to plant.

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We ate green eggs and ham for St. Patrick’s Day. It’s our tradition.

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And Kelsey made green lemon squares.

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Most of us wore green. We looked like an Irish clan when we all walked into church wearing our green.

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One of the shrubs in front of our house.

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A walk in the woods, Mar. 22. Garrett and Emma swinging on grapevine.

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It was a wonderful day at the park!

And a very full three weeks or so with lots of green!

Kelsey’s St. Patrick’s Day Celebration

Kelsey really enjoys celebrations. So much so that she actually helps me pull them off! I have always had to do most of the planning and work throughout our years of memory-making, but now that Kelsey is older, she helps a lot. She gets really excited and remembers our traditions and reminds me of them. This year she remembered the green lemon squares I made a couple of years ago. So ta-dah! This year we made green lemon squares again. I just need some nudges and some ideas and some help with the work, and I accomplish a lot! Am I asking for too much?

Kelsey fixed all of the green eggs and ham. I think she used 2 dozen eggs. She did a great job. They were delicious!

She set the atmosphere with a CD of Celtic music. She squeezed the lemons for the lemon squares. We had more lemon juice left, so she thought of lemonade – green lemonade, of course. I made the lemonade out of the lemon juice that she colored green.

She found the videos of “Green Eggs and Ham” and the Veggie Tales St. Patrick. She called everybody to come watch them on the computer.

Then she got the younger kids to draw pictures of as many green things as they could think of.

They also made cards for Grandpa Douglas. We prayed for him as they made their cards.

Our St. Patrick’s Day celebration wouldn’t have been nearly as nice if Kelsey hadn’t pitched in and helped so much.

Thank you, Kelsey!

The kids all watched “Green Eggs and Ham” on YouTube. Then they watched the Veggie Tales version of St. Patrick’s life.

Green lemonade
Green lemon squares